Clay Center Amateur Radio Club

A public outreach STEM program at the Dexter Southfield School, Brookline, MA.
 

Welcome to the Clay Center Amateur Radio Club!  (Click for brochure)

4th grade southfield student soldering

A 4th grade Southfield student solders an electronics project that she put together herself.

Have you ever listened to short-wave radio signals from a distant country, heard people talking, and wished you could talk with them?  Come learn about this fascinating, life-long hobby enjoyed by millions around the world. We welcome those who would like to explore radio communications and even perhaps go for a Technician Class license from the FCC.

A STEM Activity for Youth

Many children become interested in electronics-related sciences at an early age, particularly with all the “gadgets” they have access to these days.  Radio electronics can be enjoyed outside the classroom as a “hobby” that can last a lifetime.  Helping children learn amateur radio basics at an early age can help instill a lasting positive attitude toward science and math and keep their interest in later years when peer pressure and competing activities sometimes displace their science interests.  Many older generation radio operators often talk about getting their ham radio license around age 12 or 13 and enjoying the hobby on and off for many years.  Some students applying for college have mentioned amateur radio on their applications as a way to set themselves apart from the average students.  For those students interested in studying engineering, computer science, or communications, amateur radio is a valuable asset. Amateur Radio is a blend of science, technology, engineering, and math, the basis of a true “STEM” subject.

Parents: Download a concise After School HAM RADIO FAQ for Parents discussing exams, how your child may participate, the benefits and opportunities, and links to other resources. A “must read” for parents who have children who want to get their HAM radio license.

© 2013- Clay Center for Science and Techology